stay loose

vb
American
an alternative version of hang loose

Contemporary slang . 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • stay loose — (informal) Keep cool, keep relaxed • • • Main Entry: ↑loose * * * hang/stay ˈloose idiom (informal, especially NAmE) to remain calm; to not worry • It s OK hang …   Useful english dictionary

  • stay loose — ► hang (or stay) loose informal, chiefly N. Amer. be relaxed. Main Entry: ↑loose …   English terms dictionary

  • stay loose — Go to hang loose …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • stay loose — v. be cool; relax; be calm …   English slang

  • hang or stay loose — idi cvb sts Informal. to remain relaxed and unperturbed …   From formal English to slang

  • loose — ► ADJECTIVE 1) not firmly or tightly fixed in place. 2) not held, tied, or packaged together. 3) not bound or tethered. 4) not fitting tightly or closely. 5) not dense or compact. 6) relaxed: her loose, easy stride. 7) careless an …   English terms dictionary

  • loose — loose1 W3S3 [lu:s] adj ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(not firmly attached)¦ 2¦(not attached)¦ 3¦(not tied tightly)¦ 4¦(hair)¦ 5¦(clothes)¦ 6¦(free)¦ 7¦(not exact)¦ 8¦(not very controlled)¦ 9¦(not solid)¦ 10¦(sport)¦ …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • loose — 1 /lu:s/ adjective 1 NOT FIXED not firmly fixed in place: One of my buttons is loose. | a loose floorboard | come/work loose (=become loose): A piece of stair carpet had come loose. 2 ROPE/CHAIN ETC a rope, chain etc that is loose is not fastened …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • loose — loosely, adv. looseness, n. /loohs/, adj., looser, loosest, adv., v. loosed, loosing. adj. 1. free or released from fastening or attachment: a loose end. 2. free from anything that binds or restrains; unfettered: loose cats prowling around in… …   Universalium

  • loose — I. adjective (looser; loosest) Etymology: Middle English lous, from Old Norse lauss; akin to Old High German lōs loose more at less Date: 13th century 1. a. not rigidly fastened or securely attached b. (1) having worked partly free from… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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